All things green

All things green

As we move into the later months of year evergreen foliage becomes more important in the garden and also in cut flower choices available.

With our temperate climate we are spoild for choice in what can be home grown for use in wedding & everyday florals.

Keeping a simple vase or even a jam jar placed on your kitchen window, of flowers or foliage when you don't have anything blooming in your garden. It will connect the outdoors with your home and encourages you to venture outdoors to forage even on days where our weather is gloomy. 

Ivy is not only a fantastic cut greenery suitable for almost every flower dislpay it is a fantastic source of nectar for pollinators & refuge from the autumnal & winter weather for insects generally. Its glossy leaves and clusters of green flowers provide texture when most other plants are becoming dormant, its berries which follow are also a food source for birds in the garden. Ivy (Hedera helix), Irish native, is as much a part of our heritage and history as it is food for wildlife. In times past ivy berries were thought to counteract the unwanted side-effects of alcohol consumption. In ancient Rome ivy was a symbol of intellectual achievement and ivy wreaths were used to crown winners of poetry and athletics contests. Europeans used an alepole/alestake, which was a branch covered in ivy leaves, to indicate premises where wine or ale was sold. In Greek mythology Dionysus, the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, wears a crown of ivy on his head.